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: well, i'm based in irving, texas, at the university of dallas, where i'm a professor of politics. c-span: is that a full-time job still? >> guest: right. yes. c-span: and when did you--early on in your life, or maybe it wasn't early on--start thinking about things like the constitution or the declaration of independence or the founding fathers? >> guest: well, it took me a while to get there. i was a student in the '60s and '70s of leo strauss and some of strauss' students out in claremont; actually, originally, a student of allan bloom's at cornell, then i went out to claremont. and originally, i was really focused on the study of obscure texts in the history of political philosophy written by dead white males like plato and cicero and people like that. and my first book, in fact, was an interpretation of plato's apology of socrates. but it really wasn't until the '80s that i got interested in a serious way in american politics and i used my knowledge of the history of philosophy to help to understand the principles of this country. and i think it really did help, as a matter of fa
, please, ma'am. >> i'll go quickly. my name is anna, i'm from the dallas/fort worth world affairs council, and as i told everyone yesterday, i teach seniors. i've been facebooking with them, and can they ask me questions, and the point is they want to know for this right now -- because they're online with me -- should they be optimistic? they're very scared, the class of 2013, and what can you say to them that i can pass on to them about economic competitiveness and if they should be optimistic or worried? >> great question from the seniors. okay, steve. >> notwithstanding everything i said before -- [laughter] i'm actually optimistic. i think, i'm optimistic because heidi ticked off a number of these before in a slightly different context, but they're just as applicable in this context. we have the most flexible economy in the world. we have this incredibly diverse labor force, diverse group of people in this country who come here because of the opportunity. there are not that many people who leave america to go live in all these other places that we worry about being more competitive th
dallas along stan dain progress the osama bin laden movement posted a new kind of threat to a global network of well-founded suicidal killers with no fixed address. the vast arsenal, the nuclear stockpiles the army and navy and the bureaucratic structure for surveillance compass buying and analysis was to mood deter attacks and who would dare with the response would be swift and fatal and unstoppable? would if they came from nowhere? the answer was information. finding the enemy has been one of the most basic challenges of war. adjust up the level of difficulty scattered all over the world using to mccue petitions giving the complexity the use of saddam's and the tricks of this by kraft how is the new enemy to be found? that sinjar raid rolodex shows how. six years later still haunted by the the finance image united states of america had won strong consolation it figured out how to fight back. >> wed read talk about the raid that killed '07 bonded from a that is the real story. this story of how the united states use the capability to find people that are very difficult to find and t
that lee harvey os ward was going to b shoot at jack kennedy that morning in dallas. >> bryan will latell. here is the book castro secret." the cia and cuba's intelligence machine.ck it unfortunately we ran out ofs time. you have to pick it up and read it for yourself.ng it's unfortunate. it's a good story. bryan, thank you for joins us on booktv here in miami. >> thank you so much. >>> is there a non-fiction author or book you would like to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv@c-span.org. or tweet us@twitter.com/booktv. >>> novellest james patterson is speaking at the miami book fair. he talked about the reading program that he has personally started. we wanted to look at some of the other reading programs that are available in the united states and see what the efforts are. i want to begin with jane robinson. the chief financial officer of a group called first book. if you can describe what first book is to start? >> yes, hi, peter. i just want to say thank you to c-span for all the incredible support you have given to the entire industry and the entire concept of reading
yosemite this summer. people have been dying in north texas of west nile fever. in the dallas area alone there have been 15 people died of west nile fever just since july. there have been an ebola outbreak began in central africa, the democratic republic of the condo has an ebola outbreak that has killed three dozen people, i think, by now, and it is still going on. there is another outbreak across the border in uganda unrelated to the spillover that had cost the outbreak in the democratic republic of the congo. that one has been ended. these things are happening. this is like a drumbeat of disease, outbreaks and small crises. there is another on the arabian peninsula. there is a virus that emerged that closely resembles the saar's virus, the loss to the same family, corona viruses, the virus that really scared the disease experts back in 2003. this new virus out of the arabian peninsula has only killed one person. put another man in the hospital in britain, but scientists all over the world are watching it carefully. why? because they know that the next big one could look something like
. in the dallas area alone, the sifting people who died of west nile fever just since july. there has been an ebola outbreak again in central africa. the democratic republic of the congo has an ebola outbreak that killed three dozen people i think right now and it's still going on. there was another ebola outbreak across the border in uganda unrelated to the spillover that caused the outbreak in the democratic republic of the congo. that one has been ended. today things are happening. this is like a drumbeat of disease outbreaks and small crises. there's another on the arabian mint. there is a virus that emerged that closely resembles the farsightedness, belongs to the same family. got really scared disease experts back in 2003. this new virus out of the arabian peninsula has only killed one person come up with another man the house will and britain, the scientists over the world are watching it carefully. why are they watching it carefully? thing of the next big one could look something like that. so as i say, there's a drumbeat of these things. those diseases that i've mentioned i'll hav
in dallas, walking across the street to an event at the adolphus hotel. focusing on well-to-do women who were therefore a event. they carried what mrs. johnson described in her oral history is a sea of angry slogans. she says that they did not like lbj and they hated kennedy. and this mom essentially blocked the passage. it made a very different and difficult for them to get through. and you have to realize the potential for some sort of mob action. she described it as just an animal like tense atmosphere where the slightest thing could trigger a riot. at one point, one of the signs not mrs. johnson's hat off. lbj recognized that she wasn't going as fast as she should have. but they were making the most of this event for television. it would display the behavior of his opponents. so that is certainly an example of courage. >> also on the lady bird special. when she toured the south after she signed the civil rights act, which i'm going ask mark to talk about. can you please tell all of us what his response to russell was when he was pushing the acts through? >> you mentioned loyalty and
to be a pretty good incentive to get somebody to drive. sheppard is a nice place. dallas is into fiery there. do they still guarantee you guys a fighter at it in so? >> now, pretty much the same as anywhere else. >> that was the same in damage. when i went through, if you were to shepherd you were going to get a fighter. there was some good ones, but the most part they got a lot of fighters. it's probably better that way and more fair all around. what else? underwent okmulgee guys up. okay, well thanks for coming very much. i appreciate it. if you guys buy the book, even better. harpercollins actually send me up to read a couple more. one is nonfiction. it's the history of fighter pilot, not just americans, but all of them. i've been burning how much i didn't know about my own profession. it's going to be a very interesting book. it's due sometime next year, so i'll take another six months after that, so maybe 2014. and then there's a fictional book i wrote called the mercenary that will be out in e-book form to start with i think in january or february. unlike most good fiction, it's not really
of wild bees, distant stars, and frontier pioneers. the dallas morning news reported that the audience listened to the poet's words, quote, "with the strictist attention with applause." now, the next speaker, the chief justice of texas spoke in prose. his review was nowhere near as good as the poet received. [laughter] now, in light of that, i thought the best course would be for me to compos a poem for this occasion. [laughter] again, there's no need to panic or run for the exits. i gave up that plan when i couldn't find suitable words that rimed with latin terms. [laughter] president lovitt spoke third and delivered the speech titled "the meaning of the new stietion." his essay is, in fact, a truly magnificent scholarly work with a thoughtful and prophetic vision on what the institution would become. i want to focus on one point he made observing a great challenge on any institution is, quote, to plan at one and the same time for the immediate future and for the next 100 years. now at the century mark, it's safe to say that president lovitt and six presidents who followed him met the
is anna from the dallas-fort worth world affairs council. i teach seniors, so i have been facebooking for the conference and the ask questions and i answer back and i've already scanned my notes. the point is they want to know for this -- right now because they are on line with the -- should they be optimistic? they're very scared, the class of 2013. what can i pass on to them about economic competitiveness and they should be optimistic or worried? >> great question from the seniors. okay, steve. slingbox >> notwithstanding everything i said before -- [laughter] i'm actually optimistic. i'm optimistic because heidi ticked off a number of these before in a slightly different context. we have the most flexible economy in the world. we have this incredibly diverse labor force and a diverse group of people in this country that come here because the opportunity. there aren't that many people that leave america to go all these other places that we worry about being more competitive than we are the there's a long line of people that still want to come here. immigration is a big issue in this
of the others. every member, hamilton said it makes it immune to entry. dallas' argument in the federalist. nobody forward a little bit into the first federal election. remember, you vote for two members. each has the vote. he says, what if somebody who really doesn't like washington, like maybe their son got overlooked for promotion or some thing. washington had dirty anointed items as a vice presidential possibility. they say what if everybody votes for adam, but a few disgruntled souls strawberry vote from washington, what will happen? atoms will sneak through the presidency. so he writes letters to people in six of the 11 state. we need to throw with seven or eight those for adam. to insure against this possible. not isn't he the guy who said there's no intrigue and somehow it is secure. how could they deluded themselves to doing not? look, they're tired and want to move on, not the intuitive definition is like in entries like people whispering in the corridors of european courts and they don't even entertain the notion that entry can happen through the mail over a period of time and p
the first five minutes of an episode of" dallas" from 19788 which was hottest show from reality tv. who shot j.r. show, listeners or viewers will remember. it is amazing. ever can catch it on tv fascinating to watch because it is so, the relationship between the producers and the writers and the audience is so condescending. there is this very palpable sense that the creators of the show just think that the audience can't possibly understand who these characters are and they spend two minutes kind of going, these two people are brothers. did everybody get that? whereas show today, not just that edited more quickly, that they're able to kind of go much faster and challenge the audience. look at a show like, "lost" which was insanely complicated. that show would have never gotten anywhere near national television in 1977 or '78. so there is tolerance for complexity and, and being challenged that the audience has now that we didn't have when i was growing up. >> host: steven johnson is our guest on "in depth". bill in oklahoma, you are first up today. please go ahead with your question or comme
heritage. these elders speak with profound intellectual depth. when i spoke to dallas reared in one of a translator she says she deeply felt this book was the voice of the older and was just translating the book. she wanted me to read this acceptance speech evers the humble and unassuming elders speak with kindness generosity profound intellectual depth and speak of the consciousness of land and sea. this team initiative by the elders themselves over the past seven years produced a series of books on a growing in importance as we look to our bears and realizes how to better live on this land. to talk to guilders where they build camps and fished and listen to the older people tell stories. it is a model for the rest of america with the foundational beginning of our rio education. -- real education. alice and and sent to the acceptance speech. they're not here today. >> we're both grateful for the honor to name our but for the mayor 10 book award. this it is an extraordinary event. never before has the use of men and women of southwest alaska of been recognized nationally for the elo
into the convention, and, you know, the front page of the dallas morning nudes, gop shifts on immigration. i mean, it was amazing to see that, wow, you know, we're going to come in here and label them this anti-hispanic, you know, anti-anything and it was a totally different route. then some people came to me, and some friends of mine said we've got to take this to the national level. and we went to the national platform in tampa and started talking about it, and we got a national guest worker endorsement on the republican national platform which was great. thought my work was over, and then election day hits, and wednesday my phone starts getting blown up again. you know, it's time to get back in the debate again. we need to start doing more, we immediate to start talking about this. i believe free market solutions are a part of this. i believe in strong border security. the anti-immigration groups will try to label us as open borders, big business, wants cheap labor. i can tell you if we can fund blackwater security forces in iraq -- and i'm not saying we use blackwater -- but some type of secu
, castro, military-industrial complex, what happened in dallas, the assassination of john f. kennedy, sunday at kevin:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> florida senator marco rubio will be in ireland, he will speak at a fund-raiser, and the first trip to iowa. >> earlier this week retiring massachusetts congressman barney frank talked about sequestration and upcoming fiscal cliff negotiations which he believes will cause a, quote, short-term bumps to the economy. he spoke at an event in the atlantic. it is 20 minutes. >> congressman barney frank in his last term as congressman, too big to fail and author of the deal breaker column in the new york times and cnbc, what is it? scrawled box. i watch it every day. and half of dodd-frank here. >> thank you. thank you for being here. about 100 things to talk about in a short amount of time and a lot of issues related to wall street, given the water cooler conversation seems to be the last 72 hours, general david petraeus and the real housewives of tampa. i figured i would give you the floor to tell us your thoughts. >> having argued to, and to
for a b. in dallas they've tried offering second graders $2 for each book they read. now, some people think this is a promising idea, other people aren't very happy about it. so let's have a discussion here and begin by taking a survey of opinion. if you were the superintendent of one of these school districts and you were approached with this proposal, how many think it's a good idea worth trying, and is how many would object in principle? be let's see, first, those of you who -- how many would object? how many would not like this idea? quite a few. and how many think it's worth trying? all right. we have a pretty good division of opinion. let's begin by those who object. who is willing to explain, to offer your reason? why do you think this would be objectionable in principle in -- principle? anyone? who will start us off? yes, stand up, and we'll get you a microphone. go ahead. >> i would -- >> over here. >> i would object because there's a basic value in learning, there's a basic value in learning, a basic excitement about learning new things. if you start paying for that, you rem
states, atlanta, dallas, los angeles -- who is doing that reporting here? so much attention is focused on what is happening in mexico, we are lamenting the strengths or weaknesses of reporting in mexico. the mexican reporters, especially the regional ones, were hardest hit. it is the once in these regional outlets like tijuana. they want to know who was telling the other side of the story and who is doing the money reporting, all these narco dollars. who is doing the story about money laundering? i do not know if i answered your question, but that is certainly a kind of push back there. who is telling the good story and -- big story and the small story? >> let me bring in carrie lozano to the conversation. she is a documentary filmmaker and journalist who has done a lot of work. her from "underground" appeared at sundance. also, she is an emerging expert on the question of collaborative reporting, journalists, between news organizations, citizens, she works in the investigative reporting for uc berkley and has co-founded the collaboration central. very basic question -- who is doing th
francisco's the birds that are all very democratic. denver las vegas and phoenix and the dallas houston san antonio atlanta charlotte and north carolina were very republican so i think calling suburbs analyzing pricing suburbs doesn't work. you have to look at each individual suburb word each region of the country and finally, number six, we have to rethink the way we spend money on politics. this was a 6 billion-dollar election-year with status quo results. i think the biggest success when it comes to money and politics and i'm not talking about the message but the macro-- karl rove separated billionaires from billions of their dollars to what effect? i mean it may be more effective way to pay voters directly. there is probably more return for your investment and i would conclude by saying that probably the supreme court of the united states, the second most important institution in the united states in aiding the economic recovery, because next to the fed they have done more to pump more money, more stimulus into the economy in states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania and
until billets raining on kennedy and dallas during the east st. louis of his life. what did he know? how did we get here quiet what kept us moving? who kept us moving? miles davis is one of the people who kept me moving. he and i went to the same high school as did one of the pioneers up on the hill. but for moral service, we couldn't get a spot on the sidewalk, not to mention trying to get a seat in lincoln high school, where he graduated in 1944 and was one of two teenagers of the black community at juilliard. that may be her record. i read a long poem of which all recite. trust up and came began a scenario climb up the tribal stairwell. greeks, radiant at the at the at the, spread like laughter or ethiopia's wings. more in its own percussive rise became the st. louis area. bore witness to the calm, the careless silence, the casket to tears, that death of the crew became the burden of an ancestor. hear y'all, the death of the two became the birth of an ancestor. and many of the newspapers that covered that memorial had headlines in kansas city, st. louis come the death of the crew do m
to a big fan. i saw this from the guy from dallas, there will be enormous political pressure on the secretary of the treasury. in what universe? right on america today is even thought of helping an institution they be impeached. i do not understand how people misread. >> you don't believe if jpmorgan or citigroup are really troubled that think they were going down and markets are falling apart under voluntary sahara or would find a way to save that for quick >> is the other way round. he must be disconnected with what's going on in the world. seriously, any effort to help existing financial institution, from the guy who got the point better, debating guy who wrote the book who attacks us as well as the economist for preventing intervention at that point. if you're time that congress would then vote to change it, it would take a vote of congress. it would be illegal to do anything with the institution until the institution is spread out. under the law, sarah palin was partly right. we did t-test panels in 2010, but they were for big banks. no aid can go to any institution unti
, the military australia complex? what happened in dallas. the assassination of john f kennedy. sunday at 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >>> c-span incites middle and high school send a video to the president. what is the most important issue he should consider to win the grand prize of $5,000. it is open to students grade sixth through twelve. and the deadline january 18, 2013. for complete details and rules go online to studentcam.org. >>> you are watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. on weeknights watch key public policy events and every weekend the latest non-fiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past rams and get our schedule at the website. you can join on the conversation on social media sites. >>> now attorney general eric holder announces a settlement in the bp. bp will pay a $4.5 fine and two men had been charge wpped manslaughter. this is a half hour. has the latest -- task forces members announcing the latest -- and ongoing efforts to achieve justice and that -- ability for this tragedy. today the united states district court here in the eastern describing dis
there was a large conspiracy usually involving figures within the u.s. government what happened in dallas, the a a assassination of john f ken i kennedy. >>> says the u.s. will not follow off the so-called fiscal cliff. allen was at the club of washington to talk about the economy and job creation. this is forty minutes. >>> so we're pleased today to have the chairman of the president counsel of economic adviser with us. alan krueger. the native of new jersey. he went to undergrad at cornell. he was not only the top of the class, but a high jumper on the track team. then went harvard to get the ph.d. in economics, and his thesis adviser was larry summers. he has an academic career and is now a has been a name professor at princeton teaching economics, it's now second tour of duty in the obama administration beginning in the obama administration he served as assistant secretary of economic affairs in treasury, and then went back to princeton and was lured back by the president to become the chairman of the counsel of economic advisers. a position he consumed a year ago confirmed in novembe
happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy sunday at 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >>> to middle east experts now whether the use of drops is effective to come pat al-qaeda, both featured pammists at the brookings institution looking at the rides of the terror group in yemen. this is about an hour and a half. >>ed good -- >> good morning and welcome. i'm the research director here at brookings for middle east policy. i'm delightedded that you all came out on such a cold and miserable day in washington. that shows your fortitude and the importance of what we'll discuss today. one of the developments i would say of the last decade, perhaps a little longer is the emergence of yemen from a country that was seen as relatively obscure, and from a washington point of view, at least, something that was not a priority to becoming a country that has gone from, i'd say, the edge of the radar screen to the center. unfortunately, as yemen moved, knowledge of yes , ma'am men,ñr -- yemen, among the policy community and broadest middle east community in general has not kept pace
in the u.s. navy. after earning his jd from smu he worked in dallas' largest law firms -- lesson in health care matters. later, and come in the columbia hospital corporation, established what has become the largest for-profit health care conglomerate in the nation. columbia hca employs over 199,000 people. that's job creation for you. [applause] and provides quality health care for millions of people. but he didn't rest there. he and his wife, and, i worked with a group called world vision to provide primary health care system in bengali, kenya and does governor to step up its commitment to the people of florida, emphasizing the importance of accountability he ran his campaign under the slogan, let's get to work on a free system resonates with flirting today. his policies to foster economic asperity. under his leadership, he 25 months of consecutive job growth. so we have a notch bringer who succeeded in the air and translated success in the governments here. sadly, governor scott's mother very recently passed away come at the yeti is still here today managing to fulfill his commitment to
for the ceremony. this is drawn from an indian legend invokes wild bees, stars, and frontier pioneers. "the dallas morning news" reported the audience listened with the strictist attention with frequent applause. now, the next speaker, the chief justice spoke in prose. his review was nowhere near as good as the poet received. [laughter] in light of that, i thought the best course would be for me to compos a poem for this occasion. [laughter] there's no need to panic or run for the exits i gave up the plan and couldn't think of words that rhymed with lat latin legal terms. [laughter] the essay is, in fact, a truly magnificently scholarly work presents thoughtful and prophetic vision of what the rice institution would become. i want to focus on one point made. he observedded the great challenge in creating any constitution is, quote, "to plan at one in the same time for the immediate future and for the next 100 years." we're now at the century mark, and it's safe to say president lovitt and the six presidents who followed him met his challenge. rice's academic programs ranging from space, science, a
states. really there's some concentrated areas. there's places like, you know, dallas/fort worth area, places like southern california and the seattle area where boeing -- and also in missouri where they build some of the military aircraft. but it's the minority of the states in the country. and the notion that this spreads all over the place is not borne up by the few actual surveys that have been done. the pentagon was forced to do some years ago a study on subcontracting, and they found that these main areas where the prime contracts were also received many of the subcontracts. so i think there is more of a concentration of pentagon spending than would be suggested. and then in the areas like virginia where senator mccain, senator kelly ayotte of new hampshire, senator lindsey graham of south carolina, you know, took the scare tour and talked about shipbuilding, talked about military bases, talked about defense consulting firms in northern virginia, um, that argument didn't fly in the elections even though they tried to pin these potential effects on president obama. he carried vir
nile virus was around dallas because of budget cuts. remember, this is a disease spread by mosquitoes. texas has no entomologist anymore. they cut the position because they ran out of money. >> we've got time for one -- we'll finish on time at 8:30. we've got time for one or maybe two. >> [inaudible] >> okay. depending on conciseness, maybe a couple more. >> so for over a century, the u.s. forest service had the policy of extinguishing any fire that was detected on federal land, and as the ability to detect fire from the air and from satellites has improved over the decades, unfortunately, that kind of wound up with a situation where we have these huge, hot, devastating forest fires in the modern era. is our public health policy doing something similar? >> i don't know who's going to answer that one. [laughter] it's an interesting metaphor, but i don't know if it's necessarily completely transferable to this situation. >> let me vary that a little bit then and ask, um, what about the trend of decline in vaccination? another of our colleagues, seth luiken, wrote a book called "the pani
, february 1st 1967 i thought of my goldman sachs. on february 1st 1967, the dallas roughly 850. lo and behold, 15 years later was it okay. and i made my money by flying things that were very cheap. so our 700 of the doubt, equivalent. even though the old world market was going nowhere. i can very well appreciated scenario for the cause in need of government around the world to get the financial house in order of the next two years we can remain in environment at see we deal with the fiscal cliff, as we deal with the huge deficit issues in the market and sees a need to deal an intelligent fashion. so unprepared. you folks are young, early 20s, late teens, whatever tissue can muster another three years for this. as i said at the beginning life expectancy is 82. another three years is going to be very painful to me, but i'm going to do it. i'm going to work out of because this what i love doing and have an obligation to do. i took somebody's money and effort to manage it intelligently improperly. i'm a value investor. some of her versus what is a investor meeting? what it means to me
and san francisco is all very space and a loss vegas and phoenix and the suburbs of dallas, houston, san antonio, atlanta, charlotte and south carolina were very republican, so calling the suburban analyzing by saying the suburbs doesn't work. you have to look at each individual suburb or the region of the country and finally number six you have to rethink the way in politics. this is a $6 billion election-year status quo results i think the biggest success when it comes to money in politics and i'm not talking about the methods that the macrois karl rove sabrue de billionaires' from billions of dollars. the more effective way to pay the voters directly. there's more and more return from your investment and that would conclude by saying the supreme court of the united states is the second most important institution in the united states in aiding the economic recovery because next to the fed they have done more money, more stimulus into the economy and part of the states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania and california in any institution. they may even be more important i
couples to be allowed to marry for each stray couple of his divorced. congratulations dallas vegas, you're about to be the case city in america. and to finally bring transparency back to political process, like drugs and cigarettes, hd piece of legislation must clearly state the possible side effects and must be titled, to reflect its actual content. thus the picture that will be renamed fescue thomas jefferson. we don't stop there. our manifesto will enlighten the american people with chapters entitled the elitist scourge, how to a people who are better than you. the metric system, exactly ten times more often than imperial units. we peeled off the layers of america. american exceptional wasn't about to make other countries feel bad about the bodies. we present practical solutions and how to relieve america's sexual tension. crime and punishment, and then come again. we even created simple multiple choice questionnaires for healthy american children determine the value as future americans. and to reinvigorate the youth vote, many of which are right here, we have invented a drinking gam
. dallas morning news chronicle -- amazing to see that, wow, we were going to come in here labeling them as anti-his panic, anti-anything, and it was a total different route. people came to me and friends of mine said we got to take this to the national level. we went to the national platform in tampa, talk about it, got a national guest worker endorsement on the republican national convention platform which was great. thought work was over, and election day hit, and wednesday my phone blows up again, and it's time to getÑjr back in the debate again. we have to do more. we have to talk about this. you know, i believe free market solutions are a part of this. i believe in strong border security. the anti-immigration groups will try to label us as open borders, big business, wants cheap labor. i can tell you if we can fund blackwater security forces in iraq, and i'm not say using blackwater, but a type of security force that's licensed in doing a good job, we need to do that. we need to secure our borders. in texas, i can tell you, i've been down first hand in burkes county texas the effe
the convention and, you know, the front page of the dallas morning news, or fort worth star-telegram, gop shifts on immigration. it was amazing to see that wow, we were going to come in here and label them anti-hispanic, anti-anything. it was a total different route. vincent cable came to me, some friends of mine said we've got to take this to the national level. we went to the national platform and started talking about it. we got a national guest worker endorsement on the republican national convention platform which was great. thoughts my work was over, then election day hit. wednesday my phone starts getting blown up again. it's time to quÉbec in the debate again. we need to start talking about this. i believe the free market solutions are a part of this. i believe in strong security. the anti-immigration groups will try to label us as open borders, big business wants cheap labor. i can tell you if we can fund blackwater security forces in iraq, and announcing -- some type of security force that its license in doing a good job, we need to do that. we need to secure our borders. i can tell y
that lee harvey oswald was going to shoot at kennedy that morning in dallas. >> brian latell, the book "castro's secrets mpt the cia and cuban's intelligence machine." we ran out of time, and he can't tell you the poisen pen story. pick it up and read it yourself. it's unfortunate because it's a good story so, brian, thank you for joining us on booktv here in miami. >> thank you so much. >> well, the next panel is starting here. we'll take you to the room now. this is some war memoirs and books. jake tapper of abc news wrote a book called "the outpost: untold story of americanñ va" beeping min bush" dust to dust accounts, and also "the story of war" and the life that follows, setting up the room now. you can see, and they are just getting ready to introduce the three speakers. i want to remind you that the previous panel, one of the speakers there was david, "barack obama: the story," go to facebook.com/booktv, and david will be answering and commenting on your questions and comments. go ahead, you can post those now, and he will be responding, oh, in about 15-20 minutes or
construction of four dallas its incorporation in the city or the suburban sprawl of the past 50 years which is pretty much just a blur. i am a cleaned up for bid in the 1980s but after a sudden appearance of hurricane andrew and its result of $27 billion in damages the city went on a long cocaine bender. miami finally hit rock autumn with a real estate collapse in 2001 a trouble and nearly everyone he cared about it. still miami has a new outlook on life and it's just going to take it one day with the largest population in the united states at a time. [laughter] >> dave perry. >> again he does not exist, madam. he is just a fantasy. you are mentally ill and diluted because that person is a figment of the imagination. >> but let's talk about writing. creative process of browsing the internet, drinking coffee, going out for a walk and. >> that is what writing is. [laughter] >> what the? i heard brosnan. do we have a croatian and not en's? >> let me find him. >> we have a team of researchers and they brought us well. winston churchill, small talking man deployed by great britain during the sec
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